Crime

More on Crime

July 25, 2019 Press Release
WASHINGTON, DC – Within the first two weeks of re-entry, individuals released from correctional facilities are 129 times more likely to die from an opioid overdose than the general population. To help ensure that individuals can access the care they need, Senators Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) and Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), and Congressman Bobby Scott (VA-03) reintroduced the Supporting Positive Outcomes After Release Act. This legislation would prohibit states from terminating an inmate’s Medicaid coverage while they are incarcerated, a practice that often prevents individuals from accessing treatment in the critical days and weeks after release. Instead, states would be required to suspend Medicaid coverage, ensuring access to health care services more quickly upon release. Sixteen states and the District of Columbia routinely terminate coverage for a Medicaid patient upon incarceration or detention. The result of termination is that upon discharge, individuals need to reapply for Medicaid in order to access health care services – a process that may take up to 45 to 90 days.
March 5, 2019 Floor Statements
Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Madam Speaker, I rise today to honor the life of my friend and colleague, Walter Beaman Jones, Jr., who passed away on February 10, 2019 at the age of 76. His passing is a deep loss to this institution, and we miss him dearly in the House of Representatives. Walter was proud to represent North Carolina's 3rd congressional district, a geographically diverse district, for over 24 years and always found a way to address the concerns of his coastal constituency as well as his rural inland residents.
February 7, 2019 Press Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Congressmen Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Thomas Massie (R-VA) reintroduced the Justice Safety Valve Act in the U.S. House of Representatives. Senators Rand Paul (R-KY) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduced companion legislation in the U.S. Senate. The Justice Safety Valve Act would give federal judges the ability to impose sentences below mandatory minimums in appropriate cases based on mitigating factors. “Last year, Congress took an important first step in recognizing that mandatory minimum sentences distort rational sentencing systems, discriminate against minorities, waste money, and often require a judge to impose sentences that violate common sense,” said Congressman Scott.
December 20, 2018 Press Release
WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Bobby Scott (VA-03) issued the following statement after the House of Representatives passed the First Step Act of 2018: “Our criminal justice system is long overdue for significant and comprehensive reform. For far too long, policymakers have chosen to play politics by enacting so-called ‘tough on crime’ slogans and soundbites, such as ‘three strikes and you’re out,’ ‘mandatory minimum sentencing,’ and even rhymes such as, ‘you do the adult crime, you do the adult time.’ These policies may sound appealing, but their impact ranges from a negligible reduction in crime to an actual increase in crime. A better policy has always been to follow evidence and research to reduce crime and save money.
December 13, 2018 Press Release
WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Bobby Scott (VA-03), the top Democrat on the Committee on Education and the Workforce, issued the following statement after the passage of the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018 (H.R.6964), which reauthorizes and reforms the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA) to help state and local leaders better serve juvenile offenders and at-risk youth. “Today is the culmination of a multi-year, bipartisan effort to improve our juvenile justice system. Rather than setting policy based in slogans and soundbites, the Juvenile Justice Reform Act is guided by the best-available evidence and the best interests of young offenders, at-risk youth, and communities across the country."
September 14, 2018 Press Release
WASHINGTON, DC – Within the first two weeks of re-entry, individuals released from correctional facilities are 129 times more likely to die from an opioid overdose than the general population. To help ensure that individuals can access the care they need, Congressman Bobby Scott (VA-03) and Senator Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) introduced the Supporting Positive Outcomes After Release Act, legislation that prohibits states from terminating an inmates’ Medicaid coverage while they are incarcerated, a practice that often prevents individuals from accessing treatment in the critical days and weeks after release. The legislation would prohibit states from terminating eligible individual’s Medicaid because of incarceration, and instead, with coverage only temporarily suspended, ensure access to health care services more quickly upon release.
June 15, 2018 Floor Statements
Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentlewoman from Texas for yielding the time, and I thank her for her leadership in opposing this bill. I, too, oppose the bill. This bill is yet another in a long line of so-called tough-on-crime bills that Congress has enacted since President Nixon declared a war on drugs nearly 50 years ago. These laws have, without question, failed to win the so-called war. But they have succeeded in placing the United States as number one in incarceration rates in the world to the extent it is so bad that some studies have actually shown that our incarceration rate is so bad that it actually adds to crime because so many children are being raised by parents who are incarcerated.
June 7, 2018 Press Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Bobby Scott (VA-03) issued the following statement after voting for H.R. 3249 the Project Safe Neighborhoods Grant Program Authorization Act of 2018, which would establish a grant program that is supposed to curb gang activity: “Once again, we were asked to vote on a crime bill that was not subject to a hearing. We have no input from experts as to the value and effectiveness of this grant program. In the absence of expert advice in developing this bill, I supported it because it authorizes evidence-based and data-driven intervention and prevention initiatives. These programs are essential to reducing violent crime and include juvenile justice programs, drug and mental health treatment, and violence-reduction programs.
May 22, 2018 Press Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Bobby Scott (VA-03) submitted the following statement into the Congressional Record regarding his position on H.R. 5682 the FIRST STEP Act: “Mr. Speaker, first I would like to acknowledge the gentleman from Georgia, Representative Doug Collins, and the gentlemen from New York, Representative Hakeem Jeffries, for their hard work and dedication in improving this bill over the last several weeks. Historically, the United States of America has been plagued with serious, fundamental problems within our criminal justice system. For far too long, policymakers have chosen to play politics and disapprove of common-sense policy that is specifically geared towards reducing crime by instead enacting so-called ‘tough on crime’ slogans and soundbites, such as ‘three strikes and you’re out,’ ‘mandatory minimum sentencing,’ and even rhymes such as, ‘you do the adult crime, you do the adult time.’
May 22, 2018 Floor Statements
Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, first I would like to acknowledge the gentleman from Georgia, Representative DOUG COLLINS, and the gentleman from New York, Representative HAKEEM JEFFRIES, for their hard work and dedication in improving this bill over the last several weeks. Historically, the United States of America has been plagued with serious, fundamental problems within our criminal justice system. For far too long, policymakers have chosen to play politics and disapprove of common-sense policy that is specifically geared towards reducing crime by instead enacting so-called ``tough on crime'' slogans and soundbites, such as ``three strikes and you're out,'' ``mandatory minimum sentencing,'' and even rhymes such as, ``you do the adult crime, you do the adult time.'' These policies may sound appealing, but their impact ranges from a negligible reduction in crime to an actual increase in crime.